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Bohemond I of Warnesburg

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Bohemond I of Warnesburg (? - 9 December 1299) was the Archbishop of Trier from 1286 until 1299.

After the death of Henry II of Finstingen, Bohemond was elected the Archbishop of Trier. However he was not confirmed by Pope Nicholas IV until 6 March 1289, after two of his competitors for the archbishopric had died, and the third Gerhard II of Eppstein was elected the Archbishop of Mainz instead. As Archbishop, Bohemond won great respect and renown from the kings and princes of his time for his skills and piety, however his reign was marked by dispute with a hostile cathedral chapter. Not even the appointment of Peter of Aspelt and John Gylet by the pope to assist in the running of the archdiocese swayed the chapter, as they were opposed to them and Bohemond as they were not nobility.

When King Rudolph I of the House of Habsburg wanted to have his son Albert recognised as his successor, Bohemond and the other princes of the empire opposed it to prevent the Habsburgs becoming too powerful. After Rudolph's death in 1279, Sigfried of Westerburg of Cologne and Werner of Eppstein of Mainz held the balance of the vote, and Bohemond convinced them to vote for Adolph of Nassau instead.

Bohemond, under King Adolph, became a powerful and influential man in the Empire. He was active in the peace negotiations between England and France which were occurring in Flanders. After Adolph's death in 1279 he elected Albert of Habsburg king, fulfilling the wish of Rudolph. From the Kings of France, England and Germany Bohemond received many estates and privileges, in particular the important castle of Cochem from King Albert I.

Bohemond died in 1299 in Trier and was buried in the Abbey of Himmerode, which during his life he loved dearly.



Preceded by:

Bohemond I of Warnesburg

Succeeded by:

Henry II of Finstingen Archbishop of Trier
1286 - 1299
Theodoric III of Nassau-Wiesbaden-Idstein
against Henry III of Virneburg

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